The All of It
A screenplay adaptation of Jeannette Haien's novel by DeWitt Sage

EXT. COUNTRYSIDE. DAY.
A young man, DECLAN de LOUGHRY, 28, is trudging up a steep, thick slope of mottled green. As he reaches the round of its top, he slows, distracted by something below. He stops, never breaking his stare, and carefully lays down the fishing rod he is carrying Below him, on the narrow shelf of a valley wall which faces the sea, he has caught sight of two people. They are scavenging through the ruin of an old cottage which seems to ride, almost, on the ocean swells beyond.

He pivots and suddenly runs toward them.

DECLAN
(top of his lungs)
Don't move!

The boy and girl below stop and turn toward him. It seems, for a second,
that they might make a run for it.

DECLAN
Move back, for God's sake!

EXT. VALLEY WALL. DAY.
In a wide shot, facing the cottage and valley wall, we see now the spectacular danger. A crevasse which plunges straight down to the ocean has cut its way under one of the cottage's walls. The remains of the cottage floor are undermined and exposed, girded only by ocean spray and wind.

Declan reaches the cottage and then edges his way to its open door. As he beckons then guides KEVIN and ENDA to safety, music begins. It is a fragile children's melody which draws us past the cottage to an upland valley stream, a strand of black through startlingly green grasses, its surface broken as it widens by low stone jetties angled into the current.

MAIN TITLE.
As we move along the river's path, right to left, winding slowly inland, the melody becomes a woman's gentle singing, backed only by the river's voice.

(Opening Credits continues)

WOMAN'S SONG
Sons of your sons,
Sons passing by
Children were lost in lullaby. . .

In the same right to left movement, the edge of the river becomes pure black and now, framed within it, we are moving across a series of three wedding photographs, variations of two handsome country faces, scrubbed and tentative. It is the woman's eyes that draw us. (Music continues)

We move past this couple, back to the river...black glass slipping by. (End music. End opening credits)

There is a subtle shift in color temperature, the river's surface and sound are suddenly more sharply defined and now we can see a shape, enormous and alive, idling slowly beneath the
river surface.

EXT. VILLAGE OF ROONATELLIN. MORNING.
Morning light.

The village of ROONATELLIN curves gently with the coastline.
A bus negotiates the narrow passage of the town and a small boy on bicycle waits for an opening.
(Subtitle: ROONATELLIN, 1973)

There is a jangle of door chimes, and Catherine McPhillemy, 40, rushes out of the general store, pulling off her apron and smoothing her hair as she rushes up the sidewalk toward the church.

EXT. SACRISTY, ST. FINTAN'S CHURCH. DAY
.
Catherine McPhillemy crosses the church courtyard, noticing that the narrow carport is empty. A black, man's bicycle leans against its outside wall.

She rings the sacristy doorbell. No answer. She rings again, then begins banging on the heavy door.

CATHERINE
Father...

There is no response. She tries to peek through the curtains of the window to her right, and
raps lightly on the glass.

CATHERINE
Father, is that you?

Finally, she turns, rushes back across the courtyard, reconsiders, grabs the bicycle and takes off, ignoring a light rain.

EXT. ROAD. DAY.
At first, a dark rise seen through the rain. Then, unsteadily at its crest, there are two pin points of light coming directly toward us.

INT. CAR. DAY.
A man, FATHER DECLAN, 58, leans forward over the steering wheel, straining to see. It is raining so hard that the wipers barely put a crease in the deluge. He wipes the windshield with his sleeve and snaps off radio, muttering to himself...

MAN
Easy now. There it is...

He glances slightly to the right, then leans over and rolls down the passenger window. He smiles now at the huge swollen river he sees, barely visible at the edge of the road.

EXT. CAR. DAY.
In a wide shot, we see the tiny car against the immense river.. There is the gleam of the right blinker and the car turns into a sweeping driveway which climbs gently toward The Castle, a stark country manor house.

EXT. CASTLE. DAY.
A gangly young doorman, SEAMUS, 17, rushes out, forgetting his rain gear. He turns back, then reappears, still with no umbrella or coat, but now wearing an oversized rain hat.

As the car pulls up in front of The Castle, the doorman opens the passenger door just as the driver gets out the other side. An older man, THOMAS DUNN, well protected from the rain, appears from a service door. The driver grabs his fishing gear from the boot and heads straight for the river.


MR. DUNN
(calling after)
I've no ghillies to give you, Father.

No response.

MR. DUNN
Three days to the season and there's not a fish moving.

Father Declan doesn't break stride, but raises his right hand in greeting.

FATHER DECLAN
'Morning, Mr. Dunn

MR. DUNN
You know the castle rule, Father. A ghillie for every rod!

FATHER DECLAN
No thank you Mr. Dunn.

The priest keeps moving and Mr. Dunn abruptly waves over the doorman.

MR. DUNN
Seamus!

The doorman musters and is discombobulated by the instructions he receives.

EXT. RIVER. DAY.
Father Declan pulls back the hood of his slicker, slapping furiously at one of a swarm of midges that has penetrated its perimeter and drawn blood. We see now that under his hood there is also a collar, sopped through and entirely wilted, but a priest's white collar just the same. He casts into the deluge.

EXT. RIVER BANK. DAY.
Seamus, now outfitted in poncho, oversize wellingtons and lugging a wide landing net, suddenly slides into position at the river's edge. He peers into the rain, seeing nothing. After a few moments, he eases himself back against the bank, to wait...and to rest.

EXT. PATH. DAY.
Catherine ducks her head, barely skimming under a low branch, bicycling fast on a narrow mud track. She rounds the next corner, the river now before her, and stops abruptly.


CATHERINE
Father!

Father Declan, in mid-cast on the opposite shore, looks up.

CATHERINE
It's Kevin, Father! Enda's been calling.

Father Declan waves back in acknowledgment, pockets his pipe, and moves toward the river bank.

EXT. KEVIN AND ENDA'S HOUSE. DAY.
It is late afternoon.
Perched against a lowland's breathtaking rise from the sea is the restored stone cottage we saw earlier, in ruin. Where the crevasse was, huge boulders form a vivid stone V, their edges caulked in sea grass and moss. A thorn tree, shaped by the wind, anchors the place.

Through the deep-set, closed window we see Father Declan seated on the far side of a bed, leaning forward.

FATHER DECLAN
(voice-over)
Explain Kevin, explain! Confess!

Catherine McPhillemy rests her bicycle at the side of the cottage and hurries inside. . .

* * *